in

Emma- The Treasure of Classic Humor

Emma- The Treasure of Classic Humor 4
Emma by Jane Austen
Emma by Jane Austen

In Jane Austen’s time, every woman’s key route to success was marriage. Women were always advised to improve their social status by marrying a man of a superior status. Women of those times were often denied to work hard or focus on their career.

Although Jane Austen was a part of the society where marriage was a significant phase of every woman’s life, she was not engrossed into it. She rather engaged herself into writing numerous masterpieces like ‘Pride and Prejudice’, ‘Sense and Sensibility’, ‘Persuasion’ and much more, all containing a social setting.

Emma, written by Jane Austen, is a classic and humorous novel and was first published in December 1815, by John Murray. This novel was dedicated by Jane Austen to Prince Regent. Like most of Jane Austen’s literary works, ‘Emma’, too,  is a satire on marriages where two people are united only by class and community. This novel highlights the theme of marriage and social status in an incredibly hilarious manner.

The title of the book ‘Emma’ itself is the name of the protagonist of the book. Emma revolves around a young, beautiful and witty lady, Emma Woodhouse, who possessed an exquisite talent of matchmaking. After the attainment of her friend and former governess of Hartfield, Miss Taylor’s marriage, to a prestigious man, Mr Weston, she gets further gripped into the pleasurable chore of matchmaking.

After the attainment of her friend and former governess of Hartfield, Miss Taylor’s marriage, to a prestigious man, Mr Weston, she gets further gripped into the pleasurable chore of matchmaking. Her triumph in uniting people builds up a new interest in her mind of connecting her friend, Harriet Smith, to Mr.Elton, a vicar. George Knightley, a close friend of Emma, makes all attempts in persuading Emma to withdraw from the idea, but her ears turn deaf to all his advices. Emma succeeds in convincing Harriet that Robert Martin, a respectable farmer, is not the correct man for her.

Her triumph in uniting people builds up a new interest in her mind of connecting her friend, Harriet Smith, to Mr.Elton, a vicar. George Knightley, a close friend of Emma, makes all attempts in persuading Emma to withdraw from the idea, but her ears turn deaf to all his advices. Emma succeeds in convincing Harriet that Robert Martin, a respectable farmer, is not the correct man for her.

George Knightley, a close friend of Emma, makes all attempts in persuading Emma to withdraw from the idea, but her ears turn deaf to all his advices. Emma succeeds in convincing Harriet that Robert Martin, a respectable farmer, is not the correct man for her.

Under the guidance of Emma, Harriet refuses Robert’s proposal, against her will. While Emma attempts to get Harriet and Mr Elton closer, he falls for Emma and instead of Harriet proposes Emma.

When Emma informs him that she had thought him to be attached to Harriet, he feels dejected and leaves the town for a week. He returns with a flamboyant, boastful and charming wife. Harriet’s heart breaks when Emma reveals the entire truth to her, and Emma too feels disheartened about misleading her friend.

Emma_CE_Brock_1909_Vol_III_Chapter_III

 

Frank Churchill, Mr Weston’s son, arrives to visit his father and makes many friends in Highbury, including Emma and Harriet. George discovers Frank to be a very trivial person and warns Emma of the same. Emma blames him instead of suspecting him and carries on praising him day and night.

Jane Fairfax, an orphan, comes to stay with her aunt, Miss Bates, for a month. Her presence discomforted Emma. Emma envied her virtues and always felt annoyed when people, including George, would immensely admire her.

A major chaos takes place when Emma mistakes Harriet and Frank Churchill to be in love with each other, and she gets back into her matchmaking task. All her hopes shatter again when it is revealed that Frank and Jane were secretly engaged and loved each other. Emma feels sorry for Harriet and with great courage informs Harriet about Frank’s secret engagement.

To her dismay, Harriet confesses her love for George rather than Frank and immediately Emma realises that she too loved George. Will George ever discover Emma’s feelings for him or will Emma declare her love for George? Whom will Harriet marry at the end, Robert or George? A series of boundless questions flow continuously in the minds of the readers while reading this book.

Emma_CE_Brock_1909_Vol_I_chapter_I

Through this novel, Jane Austen has very hilariously brought out the relevance of every class and rank in society. The language used throughout the book is very straightforward. The balance between all jovial and gloomy scenes have been flawlessly preserved. Though the introduction of numerous characters builds up the humour of the plot, yet too many characters make the book a little complex for the readers to comprehend.

The originality has been perfectly maintained in the description of characters and landscapes and the dialogues. Irrelevant and extended descriptions have been avoided that facilitates the reader to maintain the smooth flow of reading the book.

The comical events within the book makes it enjoyable to be read.  The plot of the book is remarkable and engaging, especially the way Emma Woodhouse creates chaos by blindly following her vivid imagination. The tone of the book makes the reader feel connected to all the characters, and the compels the reader into flipping the pages, without a pause, till he or she smirks after the completion of the entire book.

 

Dimple Singh

Written by Dimple Singh

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

5 Upcoming TV Series To Watch Out For 12

5 Upcoming TV Series To Watch Out For

New Ties between India and U.S. 13

New Ties between India and U.S.