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The Grey World: 14 Best Grey’s Anatomy Monologues

Grey's Anatomy Monologues

Are you looking for some Grey’s Anatomy Monologues? If yes, then please all aboard the train, which will take you to the journey of ups-downs in Grey’s Anatomy Monologues because this article is all about Grey’s Anatomy Monologues.

The fact that Grey’s Anatomy has run for as long as 16 seasons is already renewed for the 17th season. It is a testimony in itself that how much the fans love the show. The enthusiasm of its supporters has not died down even a bit if measured from 1 episode till the last one. The series deals with the lives of surgeons and teaches us how it is the cycle of falling and getting up.

The characters in the series are pushed to extreme breaking points. But they never fail to try or give up. With hope in their hearts and sparkling light in their eyes, they just keep going on. In this list of Grey’s Anatomy Monologues, most of them are voice-overs by Meredith Grey until mentioned otherwise. Each episode of Grey’s Anatomy consists of monologues.

Now, let us begin with Grey’s Anatomy Monologues!

Grey’s Anatomy Monologues

Grey's Anatomy Monologues

  1. We live out our lives in the surgical unit. 7 days a week, 14 hours a day. We’re together more than we’re apart. After a while, the ways of residency become a way of life. A) Always keep score. B) Do whatever you can to outsmart the other guy. C) Don’t make friends with the enemy. Oh, and yeah, D) Everything, everything, is a competition. Whoever said winning isn’t everything, never held a scalpel. There’s another way to survive this competition, a way no one ever seems to tell you about, one you have to learn for yourself. #5: it’s not about the race at all, there are no winners or losers, victories are counted by numbers of lives saved. And once in a while, if you’re smart, the life you save could be your own.

                                                                     –Season 1, Episode 3″

  1. “We all go through life like bowls in a china shop. A chip here, a crack there. Doing damage to ourselves, to other people. The problem is trying to figure out how to control the damage we’ve done, or that’s been done to us. Sometimes the damage catches us by surprise. Sometimes we think we can fix the damage. And sometimes the damage is something we can’t even see. We’re all damaged it seems. Some of us more than others. We carry the damage with us from childhood. Then, as grown-ups, we give as good as we get. Ultimately, we all do damage. And then, we set about the business of fixing whatever we can.”

 –Season 2, Episode 24

  1. “We like to think that we are rational beings. Humane, conscientious, civilized, thoughtful. But when things fall apart, even just a little, it becomes clear: we are no better than animals. We have opposable thumbs, we think, we walk erect, we speak, we dream. But deep down we’re all still rooting around in the primordial ooze, biting, clawing, scratching out an existence in the cold dark world like the rest of the tree toads and sloths. There’s a little animal in all of us. And maybe that’s something to celebrate. Our animal instinct is what makes us seek comfort or a pact to run with. We may feel caged, we may feel trapped, but still, as humans, we can find ways to feel free. We are each other’s keepers. We are the guardians of our own humanity. And even though there’s a beast inside all of us, what sets us apart from the animals is that we can feel, dream, and love. And against all odds, against all instinct, we evolve.”

 – Season 4, Episode 12

 

  1. “At the end of the day, when it comes down to it, all we really want is to be close to somebody. So, this thing where we all keep our distance and pretend not to care about each other, it’s usually a load of bull. So, we pick and choose who we want to remain close to. And once we’ve chosen those people, we tend to stick close by. No matter how much we hurt them. The people that are still with you at the end of the day, those are the ones worth keeping. And sure, sometimes close can be too close. But sometimes, that invasion of personal space… it can be exactly what you need.”

                                                                                  –Season 3, Episode 10

 

  1. “Every patient’s story starts the same way. It starts with them being fine, it starts in the before. They cling to this moment, this memory of being fine, this before, as though talking about it may somehow bring it back. But what they don’t realize is that the fact they’re talking about it to us, their doctors, means there’s no going back. By the time they see us, they’re already in the after. And while every patient’s story starts the same way, how the story ends depends on us, on how well we diagnose and treat. We know the story hinges on us and we all want to be the hero.”                                                                                           –Season 5, Episode 5

 

  1. “Paranoia gives you an edge in the OR. Surgeons play out worst-case scenarios in their heads. You’re ready to close, you got the bleeder. You know it but there’s that voice in your head asking. What if you didn’t? What if the patient dies and you could have prevented it? So, you check your work one more time before you close. Paranoia is a surgeon’s best friend. We’re all susceptible to it, the dread and the anxiety of not knowing what’s coming. It’s pointless in the end, because all the worrying and all the making of plans for things that could or could not happen, it only makes things worse. So, walk your dog or take a nap. Just whatever you do, stop worrying. Because the only cure for paranoia is to be here, just as you are.”

–Season 6, Episode 3

 

  1. “You’re a good man. You are handsome, and kind, and smart, and good. You’re perfect. But, um… I’m busy… holding myself together with tape and glue. And a piece of me wishes that you hadn’t played golf because… then you’d be all taped and glued too… And then maybe you’d be where I am. You’re too much for me rightnow… cause I’m busy with the tape and the glue.”

–Miranda Bailey, Season 7, Episode 1

Grey's Anatomy Monologues

  1. “Okay, do you know what will happen to Cristina if she has a kid that she doesn’t want? It will almost kill her. Trying to pretend that she loves a kid as much as she loves surgery will almost kill her, and it’ll almost kill your kid. Do you know what it’s like to be raised by someone who didn’t want you? I do. To know you stood in the way of your mother’s career? I do. I was raised by a Cristina. My mother was a Cristina. And as the child she didn’t want, I am telling you, don’t do this to her, because she’s kind and she cares and she won’t make it. The guilt of resenting her own kid will eat her alive”

–Season 8, Episode 1

Grey's Anatomy Monologues

9. “There isn’t anything that he can say to me that I haven’t heard from my mother a thousand times. I’m bulletproof. But we can force all the treatment on him we want. It won’t make a difference if he decides he does not want to fight for himself. Maybe he just needs to see what it feels like to hit bottom.”

–Season 10, Episode 4

Grey's Anatomy Monologues

  1. “Hey, it’s me. I’m on the ferry. I just wanted to say that, um… God, I wish you could see this. Weather’s classic Seattle. Oh, the water is so blue. It may be the most perfect ferryboat ride I’ve ever had in my life. We’re going to do this a lot more when I get home, by the way… you, me, and the family. We’re just going to take a day and… ride the ferryboat… all day if we want. I love you, Meredith. I know I just left, and I’m not even at the airport yet, but I just wanted to say… I love you. I love our family. And we’re going to keep doing this. I’ll see you when I get home. I love you”

–Derek Shepherd, Season 11, Episode 24

Grey's Anatomy Monologues

  1. “I was born in a two-room shed with an outhouse, six brothers, not a lot of food or love or anything. Getting out of there was… When that social worker put this little baby in my arms when I looked down at my Maggie… Maggie’s the universe giving me a gift. She is a happy person. She’s cheerful. Maggie is rare. She’s special. This will give her darkness. How can I do that to the most special person in the whole world? When I die, she needs to know that she did everything that she could.”

                                     –Diane, Season 13, Episode 18

  1. “Curiosity killed the cat. It also killed a lot of Ancient Greeks when Pandora had to open that box full of death and pestilence and stuff. Why do we have to know what’s behind door number three, even when we’re pretty sure it’ll be bad for us? Put yourself in Pandora’s shoes. She’s given a gift, a wondrous box, filled with things she never even knew existed. Of course, she opened it. Wouldn’t you?”

–Season 13, Episode 19

Grey's Anatomy Monologues

  1. “Just like we need food and water, humans need each other. A brain study revealed that, when placed in an MRI, a patient’s reward center lit up when another person sat in the room. Neurons fire when we talk to someone, think about someone, and they go haywire when we hold someone’s hand. Our brains and bodies are actually programmed to seek each other out and connect. So, then why do so many people prefer being alone?”

–Season 15, Episode 2

  1. “We’d like to imagine that we’re in control. But more often than not…the chemicals in our brains control us. The insula lights up, and we are compelled to change our lives. Compelled by longing. Compelled by yearning. Compelled by a desire for more.”

–Season 15, Episode 1 of Grey’s Anatomy Monologues

The Greying World of Grey’s Anatomy is one of the longest-running shows of this century is full of monologues. The above mentioned few monologues are not the only Grey’s Anatomy Monologues. These are fourteen my personal favorite Grey’s Anatomy Monologues spread over 16 seasons.

Without a doubt, the tv series offers people advice and experiences for a lifetime. There is not even a single person I’ve ever met. You have not found this show relatable. Each and every person at one point or another is able to relate them with a character, situation, or ocean of emotion is represents.

I hope you enjoyed Grey’s Anatomy Monologues article. If you have any suggestions or modifications for Grey’s Anatomy articles, please let us know through the comments below. Also, if you would’ve liked to add some more monologues from Grey’s Anatomy, then you are free to share.

Also, if you have your personal list of favorite list of Grey’s Anatomy Monologues, please share in the comments section below.

Kirti Chhikara21

Written by Kirti Chhikara21

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